Come and See

Religious Education is at the core of our curriculum, allowing us to develop pupils’ religious literacy, knowledge and understanding of their faith. RE lessons at St Elizabeth’s are our most special lesson, you will notice how distinct they are from all of our other lessons. We follow the ‘Come and See’ RE scheme of work. “Come and See” is the response Jesus gave the disciples when they asked, “Where do you live?” (John 1:39). Our RE curriculum is therefore based on the truth revealed by God about ourselves, our life together and our ultimate destiny with God.

At the heart of our RE curriculum are our ‘Big Questions’, which ultimately drive the learning of the topic. These questions remain open ended and challenging, providing children with opportunities to engage with the deepest questions of life (1 Peter 3:15), encouraging pupil collaboration, discussion and reflection. Throughout a range of topics, children are exposed to the mystery of God, the teachings of Jesus Christ and the Church, lives of Saints, the Sacraments and the relationship between faith and life. These are explicitly taught in RE, though we develop and encourage them through our Catholic Life and Collective Worship.

At St Elizabeth’s, we have a rigorous planning system for RE which incorporates opportunities for children to analyse and reflect on a range of religious stories and sources. We prioritise the teaching and learning of RE and ensure that Continued Professional Development is readily and regularly available for our teachers to develop their subject knowledge and ability to teach RE. Our RE Subject Leaders ensures that RE is given the 10% requirement of curriculum time each week as a minimum.

RE Outline

Our RE curriculum follows three themes, which are explored at different stages throughout the year: Church, Sacrament and Christian Living.

Church: These themes take place each term and each theme gradually builds on the pupils’ prior learning from the previous topic. Children will explore ‘Family’, ‘Local Community’ and ‘Universal Church’ within this topic.

Sacrament: We explore a Sacramental topic once per term. Children will learn about all seven Sacraments throughout their primary journey: Baptism, Reconciliation, Eucharist, Confirmation, Marriage, Holy Orders and the Sacrament of the Sick. We understand these as meeting points, where God Himself is present, waits for you, blesses you and leads you deeper into the community of the Church.

Christian Living: Children will learn about Advent (celebrating life), Lent and Easter (the cost of life) and Pentecost (feasts to celebrate).

 

Franciscan Values

At St Elizabeth’s, we are very proud of our Franciscan heritage. With the help of Sr. Dorothy Paul, we have introduced seven Franciscan Values from September 2020. Our Franciscan Values are: Joy, Forgiveness, Faith, Respect, Service, Peace and Stewardship. We will all strive to live out these values on a daily basis but each class has its own value to concentrate on promoting in school and in our local community. We hope that learning and appreciating these Franciscan Values will help our pupils in their RE, as well as their Catholic Life, to incorporate into their writing, helping them to make links and show an understanding of their beliefs.

 

Our Franciscan Values Displays in the School Hall

Religious Education Policy

Religious Education Policy.pdf

‘Come and See’ – Curriculum Overview

Come and See – Curriculum Overview.pdf

‘Come and See’ – Parents’ Letters

Parents’ Letter ADVENT TERM 2020 (1).pdf

Catholic Schools, like all other schools in England are required to produce a written policy following the guidance issued by the Department of Education on Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) and Health Education. The DfE guidance can be found here. Catholic schools are required to deliver RSE in accordance with the teaching of the Church. This approach is compatible with the guidance issued by the DfE.

RSHE is part of the mission of Catholic schools to educate the whole person. It should be carried out as part of the holistic education which seeks to form as well as inform young people in preparation for adult life.  (Catholic Education Service)

As of September 2020, ‘Relationships Education’  became a statutory  subject for all primary schools and ‘Relationships and Sex Education’ became a statutory subject for all secondary schools in England. A draft statutory guidance for Governing Bodies, Head Teachers, Principals, Senior Leadership Teams and Teachers was published in February 2019 by the Department for Education.  For Catholic schools, this new curriculum provides challenges and opportunities. (TenTen Resources)

St Elizabeth’s Catholic Voluntary Academy is worked in partnership with Ten Ten Resources to ensure the school implemented a fully compliant curriculum and RSE Policy for Relationships Education (RSE) from September 2020. TenTen Resources are used widely across many Catholic schools in England.  The Catholic Education Service have approved TenTen curriculum content and standard of resources to ensure schools undertake their statutory duty.

The Governors and Senior Leadership team at St Elizabeth’s Catholic Voluntary Academy has developed a policy for RSHE, in consultation with parents, governors and the parish community.

 

Please see key documents below which relate to the intentimplementation and required impact for the teaching of RSHE.

RSE Policy

RSE Policy

Here at St. Elizabeth’s, we recognise the importance of the effective teaching and learning of reading and writing. We acknowledge that English is the door to the curriculum and we strive to instil a deep-rooted love of reading and writing in every one of our pupils.

KS1 Reading and Phonics: Read, Write, Inc.

Phonics is taught daily in EYFS, Year 1 and 2.  After recognising the words, the children practise spelling them.  At St. Elizabeth’s, we use ‘Read, Write Inc’ as our approach to teaching Phonics. We equip children with the skills to be able to read real and ‘nonsense’ words which is a requirement for the Phonics Screening testing, normally carried out in June, in Year One. If a child doesn’t pass the test in Year 1, they get the opportunity to retake the test the following year.

Phonics is assessed termly and tracked in KS1 and into KS2 when needed.  Some Key Stage 2 children may receive extra phonics intervention work, or a repetitive spelling programme intervention, with a teaching assistant.

At St. Elizabeth’s, the children in EYFS and KS1 are read to and with daily.  The Read, Write Inc. literacy programme is used to teach reading.  This programme integrates phonics with comprehension, writing, grammar, spelling and handwriting.

KS2 Reading 

In KS2, the children are taught through two separate reading sessions each day.

Session 1:
The first is a daily guided reading carousel. This comprises of five different activities that they will complete across the week. Here is an example week:

Monday: Reading their school MyBookBlog book for pleasure. They also have access to iPads for MyBookBlog at this time.

Tuesday: Independently answer domain questions based upon a short text extract.

Wednesday: Working with the class teacher to discuss the answers written in yesterday’s activity.

Thursday: Use dictionaries to look up any unfamiliar words written on their bookmarks. They can then record these in their magpie books (a book used to store exciting vocabulary they wish to use in their writing!)

Friday: Reading their home MyBookBlog with the class T.A.

The class teacher will adapt these group sessions to meet the needs of their age, the ability of the children and the domain focus. These sessions are also vital to address decoding and fluency.

Session 2: 

The second is a daily whole class reading session, following the Talk 4 Reading scheme, which teaches children how to read as a reader, and read as a writer. This strategy immerses children in reading and centres itself around the importance of reading for pleasure. Across the school, children need to know, understand and be able to utilise some difficult vocabulary (particularly in Year 6): our focus on Talk 4 Reading will give them the skills to do this. During these sessions, children experience a variety of carefully selected high-quality poetry, fiction and non-fiction texts.

This lesson involves the explicit modelling of the different reading domains, with one focus per week: Retrieval, Summarising, Vocabulary- The meaning of words, Prediction, Comparing and Contrasting, Infer and Justify, Organisation & Presentation & Vocabulary: The effect of word choice. These domains are revisited continually across the school to reinforce and strengthen the children’s reading application.

The Talk 4 Reading scheme follows a repeating five day structure:

Monday: Vocabulary – Here we explore the vocabulary, and share opinions, of our new text. We do this through RAG rating,  defining meaning with visual aids and looking at the effect of specific word choice.

Tuesday: Working on fluency –We achieve this through echo reading (My turn, your turn), modelling intonation and emphasis, performance poetry and peer reviews.

Wednesday: Summarising – Here we work towards summarising the text. We do this through creating blurbs, headlines for non-fiction texts, “Twitter” activities and story mountains.

Thursday: Model answers – Here the teacher provides the children with SATs style questions for this week’s reading domain. We model answers together as a class, looking at what makes a good answer!

Friday: Independent answers – Here the children will look at an entirely new text related to their domain. They are then presented with a new set of similar questions to answer. This allows the children to independently apply their knowledge of this week’s reading domain.

KS2 Home-reading Scheme: MyBookBlog

We have recently introduced MyBookBlog (MyBB) into our curriculum, and as a result, our children’s excitement and love of reading has rapidly increased! Through this scheme, all children are able to choose their own book – matched to their ability. The books available to the children are exciting, world-renowned titles and collections, such as the Chronicles of Narnia, the works of Roald Dahl, The Hunger Games and the works of Michael Morpurgo.

The children will select two books, one for school use and one for their home-reading book. As they progress through the book, the children then access the MyBookBlog website, where they can ‘blog’ about their chapter, answer vocabulary and comprehension questions and find out interesting facts about their chosen book. This really motivates and encourages the children to look deeper into the content of their book and ‘magpie’ words to use within their own vocabulary.

The books are sorted into ‘challenge’ levels, which helps to ensure that your child is reading a book that is appropriate for them and is supportive of their learning. If a book is levelled higher than your child’s reading level, the book will not be available to them on MyBookBlog. Please note that the teachers have reviewed these challenge levels in relation to your child’s ability and have ensured that your child’s current reading level is appropriate. This will be regularly reviewed. We have also labelled some books with a red sticker on the back, this indicates that these books are only appropriate for Years 5 and 6.

For their home-reading book, the children are expected to complete the MyBookBlog activities at home. This allows us to monitor how much the children are reading at home. The children will read with a TA 1:1 at least once a week.

We also provide the children with a ‘bookmark’ to help monitor their reading progress. On this card bookmark, the children are to write down any words they are unfamiliar with or have struggled with when reading their book. They then have the opportunity to look up these words with the TA and during the relevant guided reading session.

Whole School Talk 4 Writing Scheme

Over the past year we have adopted the Talk 4 Writing scheme of English, created by Pie Corbett. We have been working alongside T4W expert Dean Thompson to consolidate our teaching of this fantastic scheme, which enables children of all ages and abilities to learn to write with confidence and creativity. The scheme embodies a three-stage pedagogy: Imitation, Innovation and Invention, put simply: I do, We do, You do. Through it’s multi-sensory and interactive approach, the scheme aims to improve writing ability by giving pupils a secure understanding of the structure and elements of written language. This involves working with ‘tool-kits’, which the children commit to memory to aide the structure and content of their writing. Throughout this scheme, grammar is also taught explicitly. Where possible, the teaching of grammar rules is applied to the context of the lesson and uses the texts learnt for consolidation.

Imitation

Teachers start each new genre with a ‘Cold Task’ – where children have around 20 minutes to write in the style of the new genre, to show what they can already do. This is their ‘starting point’ and allows the teacher to assess the children’s initial strengths and weaknesses and plan meaningful lessons. We then introduce a ‘hook’, (a wow activity!) which fires up the children’s creativity and imagination before they immerse themselves in the model text.

Next, during this phase the children learn a model text using actions and story maps. The key to success for the children is that they internalise the text type through repetition and rehearsal. They explore the structure of the narrative and investigate the different characters, settings and events. They also begin to look closely at the language used and the effect this has on the reader. We call this process ‘reading as a writer’. The classroom becomes a dynamic, interactive resource filled with word ideas, sentence types and language tools collected by the children to use in their stories later. During these two weeks, we do plenty of short-burst writing activities so that the children begin to understand the construction of sentences and why we use certain sentences and language features for certain purposes.

Innovation

During this phase, the teacher and the children begin to change aspects of the model text using their own ideas. They explore the text using different characters, settings or events and new ideas for descriptive language whilst sticking closely to the underlying structure.  It is during this phase that the children work using their toolkits learned in the imitation phase. The toolkits, based on the features and ingredients of the model text, remind children of the different strategies they could use in their stories and helps them to see the progress they are making.

Invention 

In the this stage, the children plan and write their own text based upon the text type they have been learning. This is their opportunity to experiment with different ideas and begin to explore their own style of writing using sentence types from the model text. We also prioritise editing their work, as a key skill in writing. During independent work, expectations are differentiated for each group and children are assessed against an assessment criteria that is suitable for their level of learning.

Spelling

In Key Stage 2, we practise spelling patterns and the irregular words ordered by the Andrew Brodie spelling scheme. Spellings are sent home weekly to be learnt and tested the following week. Please check your child’s class webpage to find out which day this is.

 

Handwriting

At St. Elizabeth’s, we recognise that children’s bones develop at different rates and some children find handwriting a challenge.  EYFS develop gross and fine motor skills through fun methods such as Dough Disco.  A focus on these gross and fine motor skills will extend into Year 1 and Year 2 if necessary.

Handwriting remains a priority focus for us this year. We have spent significant time and efforts on improving our presentation across the school and have recently introduced lined handwriting books across the curriculum. We are proud to report that the impact of these, alongside the use of the Read, Write, Inc. scheme is significant. Teachers also model presentation and handwriting at the beginning of writing lessons and set high expectations for pupil presentation in books. We also strive to use a specific font when presenting children with typed copies of work, which follows our taught letter formation.

English Policy

Literacy Policy.pdf

At St Elizabeth’s School our aim is to deliver a high-quality mathematics education, providing a foundation for understanding the world, the ability to reason mathematically, an appreciation of the beauty and power of mathematics and a sense of enjoyment and curiosity about the subject.

We will help children to see that mathematics is essential to everyday life, critical science, technology and engineering, and necessary for financial literacy and all forms of employment.

Mathematics Policy

Mathematics Policy.pdf

St Elizabeth’s Maths Progression

Maths Progression

Intent

At St Elizabeth’s, we aim for children to have acquired the essential characteristics of scientists:

  • The ability to think independently and raise questions about working scientifically and the knowledge and skills that it brings.
  • Confidence and competence in the full range of practical skills, taking the initiative in, for example, planning and carrying out scientific investigations.
  • Excellent scientific knowledge and understanding which is demonstrated in written and verbal explanations, solving challenging problems and reporting scientific findings.
  • High levels of originality, imagination or innovation in the application of skills.
  • The ability to undertake practical work in a variety of contexts, including fieldwork.
  • A passion for science and its application in past, present and future technologies

We believe Science is crucial in terms of the children learning the essential skills they need to be resilient leaders. We believe in a hands on teaching and learning approach that encapsulates the spirit of what Science is all about, so that the children will forever be ‘Scientists’ in the way that they interact with the world around them. Our Science curriculum reflects this, through our mixture of theory and working scientifically. The thoughts and opinions of our children is uppermost when planning the curriculum and this approach of theory and hands on learning is what excites and enthuses them.

Implementation

  1. Overviews and progression, taken from programmes of study and Chris Quigley.
  2. Overviews broken down into medium term planning showing both theory and working scientifically.
  3. Medium term plans broken down in to objectives of key knowledge and working scientifically.
  4. Which is used to form exciting, practical and theory based lessons for each topic of work.
  5. Topics are assessed by the teacher using insight and assessment of the practical elements using TAPS.

Our Science Curriculum

St Elizabeth’s – Science Curriculum Map – 2020-2021.pdf

Science Policy

Science Policy.pdf

Intent

At St Elizabeth’s, we aim for children to have acquired the essential characteristics of historians:

An excellent knowledge and understanding of people, events and contexts from a range of historical periods and of historical concepts and processes.

The ability to think critically about history and communicate ideas very confidently in styles appropriate to a range of audiences.

The ability to consistently support, evaluate and challenge their own and others’ views using detailed, appropriate and accurate historical events derives from a range of sources.

The ability to think, reflect, debate, discuss and evaluate the past, formulating and refining questions and lines of enquiry.

A passion for history and an enthusiastic engagement in learning, which develops their sense of curiosity about the past and their understanding of how and why people interpret the past in different ways.

A respect for historical evidence and the ability to make robust and critical use of it to support their explanations and judgements.

A desire to embrace challenging activities, including opportunities to undertake high quality research across a range of history topics.

Implementation

Curriculum drivers shape our curriculum breadth in history. They are derived from an exploration of the backgrounds of our students, our beliefs about high quality education and our values. They are used to ensure we give our students appropriate and ambitious curriculum opportunities. Our curriculum drivers are community, spirituality, culture, democracy and possibilities.

Cultural capital gives our students the vital background knowledge required to be informed and thoughtful members of our community who understand and believe in British values.

Curriculum breadth is shaped by our curriculum drivers, cultural capital, subject topics and our ambition for students to study the best of what has been thought and said by many generations of academics and scholars.

Our curriculum distinguishes between subject topics and ‘Curriculum Themes’. Subject topics are the specific aspects of subjects that are studied.

Curriculum Themes tie together the subject topics into meaningful schema. The same concepts are explored in a wide breadth of topics. Through this ‘forwards-and-backwards engineering’ of the curriculum, students return to the same themes over and over and gradually build understanding of them. In History, these curriculum themes are; Investigate and interpret the past; Understand chronology; Build an overview of world history; Communicate historically.

Golden Threads: These ‘Golden Threads’ help students to relate each topic to previously studied topics and to form strong, meaningful schema. In history these Golden Threads include: Settlements, Beliefs, Culture and Pastimes, Location, Main events, Food and farming, Travel and exploration, Conflict, Society, Artefacts.

Cognitive science tells us that working memory is limited and that cognitive load is too high if students are rushed through content. This limits the acquisition of long-term memory. Cognitive science also tells us that in order for students to become creative thinkers, or have a greater depth of understanding they must first master the basics, which takes time.

Progression: For each of the Curriculum Themes, learning is planned by year group, each of which includes the procedural knowledge and Golden Threads in each subject, giving students a way of expressing their understanding of the Curriculum.

Cognitive Domains: Within each year group, students gradually progress in their procedural fluency and semantic strength through three cognitive domains: basic, advancing and deep. The goal for students is to display sustained mastery at the ‘advancing’ stage of understanding by the end of each phase (EYFS, Key Stage 1, Lower Key Stage 2, Upper Key Stage 2) and for the most able to have a greater depth of understanding at the ‘deep’ stage.

Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Strategies: As part of our progression model we use a different pedagogical style in each of the cognitive domains of basic, advancing and deep. This is based on the research of Sweller, Kirschner and Rosenshine who argue to direct instruction in the early stages of learning and discovery based approaches later. We use direct instruction in the basic domain and problem based discovery in the deep domain. This is called the reversal effect.

Also as part of our progression model we use POP tasks (Proof of Progress) which shows our curriculum expectations in each cognitive domain.

Our curriculum design is based on evidence from cognitive science; three main principles underpin it:

Learning is most effective with spaced repetition.

Retrieval of previously learned content is frequent and regular, which increases both storage and retrieval strength.

By revisiting Golden Threads, pupils are able to build a strong schema, and develop skills as an Historian.

In addition to the three principles we also understand that learning is invisible in the short-term and that sustained mastery takes time.

Our content is subject specific. We make intra-curricular links to strengthen schema.

Continuous provision, in the form of daily routines, replaces the teaching of some aspects of the curriculum and, in other cases, provides retrieval practice for previously learned content.

Our History Curriculum

St Elizabeth’s – History Curriculum Map – 2021.pdf

History Policy

History Policy.pdf

Intent

At St Elizabeth’s, we aim for children to have acquired the essential characteristics of geographers:

An excellent knowledge of where places are and what they are like.

An excellent understanding of the ways in which places are interdependent and interconnected and how much human and physical environments are interrelated.

An extensive base of geographical knowledge and vocabulary.

Fluency in complex geographical enquiry and the ability to apply questioning skills and use effective analytical and presentational techniques.

The ability to reach clear conclusions and develop a reasoned argument to explain findings.

Significant levels of originality, imagination or creativity as shown in interpretations and representations of the subject matter.

Highly developed and frequently utilised fieldwork and other geographical skills and techniques.

A passion for and commitment to the subject, and a real sense of curiosity to find out about the world and the people who live there.

The ability to express well-balanced opinions, rooted in very good knowledge and understanding about current and contemporary issues in society and the environment.

 

Implementation

Curriculum drivers shape our curriculum breadth in geography. They are derived from an exploration of the backgrounds of our students, our beliefs about high quality education and our values. They are used to ensure we give our students appropriate and ambitious curriculum opportunities. Our curriculum drivers are community, spirituality, culture, democracy and possibilities.

Cultural capital gives our students the vital background knowledge required to be informed and thoughtful members of our community who understand and believe in British values.

Curriculum breadth is shaped by our curriculum drivers, cultural capital, subject topics and our ambition for students to study the best of what has been thought and said by many generations of academics and scholars.

Our curriculum distinguishes between subject topics and ‘Curriculum Themes’. Subject topics are the specific aspects of subjects that are studied.

Curriculum Themes tie together the subject topics into meaningful schema. The same concepts are explored in a wide breadth of topics. Through this ‘forwards-and-backwards engineering’ of the curriculum, students return to the same concepts over and over and gradually build understanding of them. In geography, these Curriculum Themes are; Locational Knowledge (understanding the geographical location of places and their physical and human features); Place Knowledge (Understanding geographical similarities and differences of contrasting places); Human and Physical Geography; (Understanding the relationships between the physical features of places and the human activity within them, and the appreciation of how the world’s natural resources are used and transported); Geographical Skills and Fieldwork (Understanding geographical representations, vocabulary and techniques).

Golden Threads: These ‘Golden Threads’ help students to relate each topic to previously studied topics and to form strong, meaningful schema. In Geography these Golden Threads include: Location, Physical features, Human Features, Diversity, Physical Processes, Human Processes, Techniques.

Cognitive science tells us that working memory is limited and that cognitive load is too high if students are rushed through content. This limits the acquisition of long-term memory. Cognitive science also tells us that in order for students to become creative thinkers, or have a greater depth of understanding they must first master the basics, which takes time.

Progression: For each of the Curriculum Themes, learning is planned by year group, each of which includes the procedural knowledge and Golden Threads in each Topic, giving students a way of expressing their understanding of the Curriculum Themes.

Cognitive Domains: Within each year group, students gradually progress in their procedural fluency and semantic strength through three cognitive domains: basic, advancing and deep. The goal for students is to display sustained mastery at the ‘advancing’ stage of understanding by the end of each phase (EYFS, Key Stage 1, Lower Key Stage 2 and Upper Key Stage 2) and for the most able to have a greater depth of understanding at the ‘deep’ stage.

Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Strategies: As part of our progression model we use a different pedagogical style in each of the cognitive domains of basic, advancing and deep. This is based on the research of Sweller, Kirschner and Rosenshine who argue to direct instruction in the early stages of learning and discovery based approaches later. We use direct instruction in the basic domain and problem based discovery in the deep domain. This is called the reversal effect.

Also as part of our progression model we use POP tasks (Proof of Progress) which shows our curriculum expectations in each cognitive domain.

Our curriculum design is based on evidence from cognitive science; three main principles underpin it: 1. Learning is most effective with spaced repetition. 2. Retrieval of previously learned content is frequent and regular, which increases both storage and retrieval strength. 3. By revisiting Golden Threads, pupils are able to build a strong schema, and develop skills as a geographer.

In addition to the three principles, we also understand that learning is invisible in the short-term and that sustained mastery takes time.

Our content is subject specific. We make intra-curricular links to strengthen schema.

Continuous provision, in the form of daily routines, replaces the teaching of some aspects of the curriculum and, in other cases, provides retrieval practice for previously learned content.

Our Geography Curriculum

St Elizabeth’s – Geography Curriculum Map – 2021.pdf

Geography Policy

Geography Policy.pdf

Intent

At St. Elizabeth’s Catholic Voluntary Academy, the intent of the Art and Design curriculum is to provide children with the knowledge and understanding that creativity is everywhere in their lives and that it reflects our own, and others, past and present heritage and culture. We recognise and value all children’s perspective of the world around them.

We aim for children to have acquired the essential characteristics of artists:

  • The ability to use visual language skillfully and convincingly (for example, line, shape, pattern, colour, texture, form) to express emotions, interpret observations, convey insights and accentuate their individuality.
  • The ability to communicate fluently in visual and tactile form.
  • The ability to draw confidently and adventurously from observation, memory and imagination
  • The ability to explore and invent marks, develop and deconstruct ideas and communicate perceptively and powerfully through purposeful drawing in 2D, 3D or digital media.
  • An impressive knowledge and understanding of other artists, craftmakers and designers.
  • The ability to think and act like creative practitioners by using their knowledge and understanding to inform, inspire and interpret ideas, observations and feelings.
  • Independence, initiative and originality which they can use to develop their creativity.
  • The ability to select and use materials, processes and techniques skillfully and inventively to realise intentions and capitalise on the unexpected.
  • The ability to reflect on, analyse and critically evaluate their own work and that of others.
  • A passion for and a commitment to the subject.

Implementation

  1. Curriculum drivers shape our curriculum breadth in Art and Design. They are derived from an exploration of the backgrounds of our students, our beliefs about high quality education and our Franciscan Values. They are used to ensure we give our students appropriate and ambitious curriculum opportunities. Our curriculum drivers are community, spirituality, culture, democracy and possibilities.
  2. Cultural capital gives our students the vital background knowledge required to be informed and thoughtful members of our community who understand and believe in British values.
  3. Curriculum breadth is shaped by our curriculum driverscultural capitalsubject topics and our ambition for students to study the best of what has been thought, created, designed and said by many generations of artists, designers, craftmakers, academics and scholars.
  4. Our curriculum distinguishes between subject topics and ‘curriculum themes’. Subject topics are the specific aspects of subjects that are studied.
  5. Curriculum Themestie together the subject topics into meaningful schema. The same themes are explored in a wide breadth of topics. Through this ‘forwards-and-backwards engineering’ of the curriculum, students return to the same themes over and over and gradually build understanding of them. In Art and Design, these curriculum themes are: Develop ideas(Understanding how ideas develop through an artistic process); Master Techniques (Developing a skill set so that ideas may be communicated); Take inspiration from the greats (Learning from both the artistic process and techniques of great artists and artisans throughout history).
  6. Golden Threads: These golden threads help students to relate each topic to previously studied topics and to form strong, meaningful schema. In Art and Design these golden threads include: Media and Materials; Colour Theory; Effects; Techniques; Emotions; Visual Language; Process; Artists and Artisans; Styles and Periods.
  7. Cognitive science tells us that working memory is limited and that cognitive load is too high if students are rushed through content. This limits the acquisition of long-term memory. Cognitive science also tells us that in order for students to become creative thinkers, or have a greater depth of understanding they must first master the basics, which takes time.
  8. Milestones: For each of the curriculum themes, there are three Milestones, each of which includes the procedural knowledge and golden threads in each subject to give students a way of expressing their understanding of the curriculum themes. Milestone 1 is to taught across Years 1 and 2, milestone 2 is taught across Year 3 and 4 and milestone 3 is taught across Year 5 and Year 6
  9. Cognitive Domains: Within each Milestone, students gradually progress in their procedural fluency and semantic strength through three cognitive domains: basic, advancing and deep. The goal for students is to display sustained mastery at the ‘advancing’ stage of understanding by the end of each milestone and for the most able to have a greater depth of understanding at the ‘deep’ stage.

 

Art and Design Curriculum Map

Intent

At St. Elizabeth’s Catholic Voluntary Academy, the intent of the Design and Technology curriculum is to prepare children to take part in the development of tomorrow’s rapidly changing world: for them to have a greater understanding of real-life applications, with emphasis on the roles that inventors, designers, engineers, manufacturers and chefs have in shaping our lives. By teaching Design and Technology, we are informing our children about social and environmental issues – they may well become potential innovators in the future.

 

We aim for children to have acquired the essential characteristics of designers/engineers:

  • Significant levels of originality and the willingness to take creative risks to produce innovative ideas and prototypes.
  • An excellent attitude to learning and independent working.
  • The ability to use time efficiently and work constructively and productively with others.
  • The ability to carry out thorough research, show initiative and ask questions to develop an exceptionally detailed knowledge of users’ needs.
  • The ability to act as responsible designers and makers, working ethically, using finite materials carefully and working safely.
  • A thorough knowledge of which tools, equipment and materials to use to make their products
  • The ability to apply mathematical knowledge.
  • The ability to manage risks exceptionally well to manufacture products safely and hygienically.
  • A passion for the subject and knowledge of, up-to-date technological innovations in materials, products and systems.

Implementation

  1. Curriculum Drivers shape our curriculum breadth in Design Technology. They are derived from an exploration of the backgrounds of our students, our beliefs about high quality education and our values. They are used to ensure we give our students appropriate and ambitious curriculum opportunities. Our curriculum drivers are community, spirituality, culture, democracy and possibilities.
  2. Cultural capital gives our students the vital background knowledge required to be informed and thoughtful members of our community who understand and believe in British values.
  3. Curriculum breadth is shaped by our curriculum driverscultural capitalsubject topics and our ambition for students to study the best of what has been thought and said by many generations of academics and scholars.
  4. Our curriculum distinguishes between subject topics and ‘Curriculum Themes’. Subject topics are the specific aspects of subjects that are studied.
  5. Curriculum Themes tie together the subject topics into meaningful schema. The same concepts are explored in a wide breadth of topics. Through this ‘forwards-and-backwards engineering’ of the curriculum, students return to the same concepts over and over and gradually build understanding of them. In Design and Technology, these curriculum themes are: Take inspiration from design throughout history (Appreciating the design process that has influenced the products we use in everyday life); Design, make, evaluate and improve (Thinking and seeing design as a process); Master practical skills(Developing the skills needed to make high quality products).
  6. Golden Threads: These categories help students to relate each topic to previously studied topics and to form strong, meaningful schema. In Design and Technology, these Golden Threads include:  Mechanisms and Mechanical Systems, Electrical Systems, Materials and Techniques, Construction, Cooking and Nutrition, Textiles, Programming and Electronics.
  7. Cognitive science tell us that working memory is limited and that cognitive load is too high if students are rushed through content. This limits the acquisition of long-term memory. Cognitive science also tells us that in order for students to become creative thinkers, or have a greater depth of understanding they must first master the basics, which takes time.
  8. Milestones: For each of the curriculum themes, three Milestones, each of which includes the procedural and ‘Golden Threads’ in each subject give students a way of expressing their understanding of the curriculum themes. Milestone 1 is to taught across Years 1 and 2, milestone 2 is taught across Year 3 and 4 and milestone 3 is taught across Year 5 and Year 6.
  9. Cognitive Domains: Within each Milestone, students gradually progress in their procedural fluency and semantic strength through three cognitive domains: basic, advancing and deep. The goal for students is to display sustained mastery at the ‘advancing’ stage of understanding by the end of each milestone and for the most able to have a greater depth of understanding at the ‘deep’ stage.

 

Design Technology Curriculum Map

Intent

At St Elizabeth’s, we aim to prepare our pupils for the future by giving them the opportunities to gain knowledge and develop skills that will equip them for an everchanging digital world. Knowledge and understanding of Computing is of increasing importance for children’s future both at home and for employment. Our Computing curriculum focuses on a progression of skills in digital literacy, computer science and information technology to ensure that children become competent in safely using, as well as understanding, technology. These strands are taught discretely through a range of units during children’s time in school to ensure the learning is embedded and skills are successfully developed. Our intention is that Computing also supports children’s creativity and cross curricular learning to engage children and enrich their experiences in school.

Implementation

Curriculum drivers shape our curriculum breadth in Computing. They are derived from an exploration of the backgrounds of our students, our beliefs about high quality education and our values. They are used to ensure we give our students appropriate and ambitious curriculum opportunities. Our curriculum drivers are community, spirituality, culture, democracy and possibilities.
Cultural capital gives our students the vital background knowledge required to be informed and thoughtful members of our community who understand and believe in British values.
Curriculum breadth is shaped by our curriculum drivers, cultural capital, subject topics and our ambition for students to study the best of what has been thought and said by many generations of academics and scholars.
Our curriculum distinguishes between subject topics and ‘Curriculum Themes’. Subject topics are the specific aspects of subjects that are studied.
Curriculum Themes tie together the subject topics into meaningful schema. The same concepts are explored in a wide breadth of topics. Through this ‘forwards-and-backwards engineering’ of the curriculum, students return to the same themes over and over and gradually build understanding of them. In Computing, these curriculum themes are; Coding and Computational thinking, Spreadsheets, Internet and Email, Art and Design, Music, Databases and graphing, Writing and Presenting, Communication and networks.
Golden Threads: These ‘Golden Threads’ help students to relate each topic to previously studied topics and to form strong, meaningful schema. In Computing these Golden Threads include: Computing Science; Information Technology and Digital Literacy.
Cognitive science tells us that working memory is limited and that cognitive load is too high if students are rushed through content. This limits the acquisition of long-term memory. Cognitive science also tells us that in order for students to become creative thinkers, or have a greater depth of understanding they must first master the basics, which taken time.
Progression: For each of the Curriculum Themes, learning is planned by year group, each of which includes the procedural and Golden Threads in each subject, giving students a way of expressing their understanding of the Curriculum.
Cognitive Domains: Within each year group, students gradually progress in their procedural fluency and semantic strength through three cognitive domains: basic, advancing and deep. The goal for students is to display sustained mastery at the ‘advancing’ stage of understanding by the end of each phase (EYFS, Key Stage 1, Lower Key Stage 2, Upper Key Stage 2) and for the most able to have a greater depth of understanding at the ‘deep’ stage.

Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Strategies

As part of our progression model we use a different pedagogical style in each of the cognitive domains of basic, advancing and deep. This is based on the research of Sweller, Kirschner and Rosenshine who argue to direct instruction in the early stages of learning and discovery based approaches later. We use direct instruction in the basic domain and problem based discovery in the deep domain. This is called the reversal effect.

Also as part of our progression model we use POP tasks (Proof of Progress) which shows our curriculum expectations in each cognitive domain.

Our curriculum design is based on evidence from cognitive science; three main principles underpin it:

Learning is most effective with spaced repetition.
Retrieval of previously learned content is frequent and regular, which increases both storage and retrieval strength.
By revisiting Golden Threads, pupils are able to build a strong schema, and develop skills to become a competent user of compute.
​​​​​​​In addition to the three principles we also understand that learning is invisible in the short-term and that sustained mastery takes time. Our content is subject specific. We make intra-curricular links to strengthen schema. Continuous provision, in the form of daily routines, replaces the teaching of some aspects of the curriculum and, in other cases, provides retrieval practice for previously learned content.

Computing Policy

Computing Policy.pdf

Computing Curriculum Map.docx

Intent

At St Elizabeth’s, we aim for children to have acquired the essential characteristics of Musicians:

  • A rapidly widening repertoire which they use to create original, imaginative, fluent and distinctive composing and performance work.
  • A musical understanding underpinned by high levels of aural perception, internalisation and knowledge of music, including high or rapidly developing levels of technical expertise.
  • Very good awareness and appreciation of different musical traditions and genres.
  • An excellent understanding of how musical provenance – the historical, social and cultural origins of music – contributes to the diversity of musical styles.
  • The ability to give precise written and verbal explanations, using musical terminology effectively, accurately and appropriately.
  • A passion for and commitment to a diverse range of musical activities.

 

Implementation

Curriculum drivers shape our curriculum breadth in music. They are derived from an exploration of the backgrounds of our students, our beliefs about high quality education and our values. They are used to ensure we give our students appropriate and ambitious curriculum opportunities. Our curriculum drivers are community, spirituality, culture, democracy and possibilities.
Cultural capital gives our students the vital background knowledge required to be informed and thoughtful members of our community who understand and believe in British values.
Curriculum breadth is shaped by our curriculum drivers, cultural capital, subject topics and our ambition for students to study the best of what has been thought and said by many generations of academics and scholars.
Our curriculum distinguishes between subject topics and ‘threshold concepts’. Subject topics are the specific aspects of subjects that are studied.
Threshold concepts tie together the subject topics into meaningful schema. The same concepts are explored in a wide breadth of topics. Through this ‘forwards-and-backwards engineering’ of the curriculum, students return to the same concepts over and over and gradually build understanding of them. In Music, these threshold concepts are; Describing, Composing, Transcribing and Performing.
Knowledge categories: These categories help students to relate each topic to previously studied topics and to form strong, meaningful schema. In Music these knowledge categories include: Instrumental and Vocal Technique, Composers, Genres, Cultural Traditions, Performers, Standard and Graphic Notation, Timbre, Texture, Harmony and Processes.
Cognitive science tell us that working memory is limited and that cognitive load is too high if students are rushed through content. This limits the acquisition of long-term memory. Cognitive science also tells us that in order for students to become creative thinkers, or have a greater depth of understanding they must first master the basics, which taken time.
Milestones: For each of the threshold concepts three Milestones, each of which includes the procedural and Knowledge categories in each subject give students a way of expressing their understanding of the threshold concepts. Milestone 1 is to taught across Years 1 and 2, milestone 2 is taught across Year 3 and 4 and milestone 3 is taught across Year 5 and Year 6.

Cognitive Domains: Within each Milestone, students gradually progress in their procedural fluency and semantic strength through three cognitive domains: basic, advancing and deep. The goal for students is to display sustained mastery at the ‘advancing’ stage of understanding by the end of each milestone and for the most able to have a greater depth of understanding at the ‘deep’ stage.

Our Music Curriculum

At St Elizabeth’s we use the Charanga music scheme.

Children learn to play the recorder in Year 3 and learn to play a brass instrument in Years 4 and 5 with the option of continuing in Year 6 to form a Year 6 band.

In addition to this, we offer violin and guitar tuition during school hours.

We have opportunities to perform during brass assemblies, our annual Brass concert and at our annual talent show.

We also have a Key Stage 2 choir who perform at our school Christmas concert.

Intent

At St Elizabeth’s, a high-quality physical education curriculum helps all pupils to succeed and excel in competitive sport; try new physically demanding activities and inspires students to live healthy, active lifestyles.  A key aim of our PE provision is to develop competence to excel in a broad range of physical activities. All students will take part in at least 2 hrs of physical active during the school week. This aim is achieved through PE lessons and active break / lunch times.

We aim for children to have acquired the essential characteristics of a​​​ well-rounded sports person:

  • All Students will take part in a range of invasion games developing the students understanding of defence and attacking play.
  • All students will take part in gymnastics lesson to develop body control, apparatus work, sequencing, teamwork, and performance.
  • All students will take part in dance and develop performance, planning, body control and rhythm.
  • All students will take part in a swimming programme with the intention to develop water confidence, safety and the ability to swim 25m competently.
  • All students will take part in outdoor adventurous activities and develop character traits of resilience, teamwork, social interactions, and planning.
  • All students will aim to develop a strong foundation in fundamental movements.
  • All students intend to develop their physical literacy skills.
  • Students will develop the control and manipulation skills over object (bat, racket, ball)
  • All students will develop the skills and characteristics in being a good leader.
  • All students will develop the understanding of how to be a good team player to support and achieve a common goal.
  • Develop strategy in overcoming challenge and developing resilience.
  • Learn about the different parts of living a healthy lifestyle, both in body and mind.

We use the Chris Quigley’s Essentials Curriculum to teach PE. This curriculum has helped to craft the content, assessments, and progressions within the PE programme. A models-based approach and pedagogy will be used in lesson to increase overall engagement within Physical education.

Implementation

  1. Curriculum drivers shape our curriculum breadth in physical education. They are derived from an exploration of the backgrounds of our students, our beliefs about high quality education and our values. They are used to ensure we give our students appropriate and ambitious curriculum opportunities.
  2. Cultural capital gives our students the vital background knowledge required to be informed and thoughtful members of our community who understand and believe in British values.
  3. Curriculum breadth is shaped by our curriculum driverscultural capitalsubject topics, and our ambition for students to study the best of what has been thought and said by many generations of academics and scholars.
  4. Our curriculum distinguishes between subject topics and ‘threshold concepts’. Subject topics are the specific aspects of subjects that are studied.
  5. The Threshold concept ties together the subject topics into meaningful schema. The same concepts are explored in a wide breadth of topics. Through this ‘forwards-and-backwards engineering’ of the curriculum, students return to the same concepts over and over and gradually build understanding of them. In Physical education the thresh hold concept is: Develop practical skills to participatecompete and lead a healthy lifestyle;(this concept involves learning a range of physical movements and sporting techniques).
  6. Golden threads: These categories help students to relate each topic to previously studied topics and to form strong, meaningful schema. In Physical education the 5 golden threads include leadership, movement, tactics & strategy, personal and social and Healthy Lifestyles.
  7. Cognitive science tells us that working memory is limited and that cognitive load is too high if students are rushed through content. This limits the acquisition of long-term memory. Cognitive science also tells us that, for students to become creative thinkers or have a greater depth of understanding they must first master the basics, which takes time and practice.
  8. Milestones: within Physical education threshold concept; there are three Milestones, each of which includes the procedural and Golden threads in each subject give students a way of expressing their understanding of the threshold concepts. Milestone 1 is to teach across Years 1 and 2, milestone 2 is taught across Year 3 and 4 and milestone 3 is taught across Year 5 and Year 6
  9. Cognitive Domains: Within each Milestone, students gradually progress in their procedural fluency and semantic strength through three cognitive domains: basic, advancing, and deep. The goal for students is to display sustained mastery at the ‘advancing’ stage of understanding by the end of each milestone and for the most able to have a greater depth of understanding at the ‘deep’ stage.
  10. Pedagogical Content, Knowledge and Strategies: As part of our progression model, we use a different pedagogical style in each of the cognitive domains of basic, advancing, and deep. This is based on the research of Sweller, Kirschner and Rosenshine who argues to direct instruction in the early stages of learning and discovery-based approaches later.
  11. Models-Based Practice (MBP) is the approach to the teaching and learning of Physical Education; for improved accommodations of learner needs across learning domains. The chosen ‘MBP’ applied for the basic domains is direct instruction and teaching Games for understanding (TGFU). The chosen ‘MBP’ for the advancing and deep domain is ‘Cooperative learning’ and ‘Sports education’. The intentionality behind the chosen pedagogical practice allows students the time to process and practice new knowledge scheme. As well as apply their schema in various contexts.
  12. Assessment is delivered through POP tasks (proof of progress) is used to continually assess all students.
  13. Our curriculum design is based on evidence from cognitive science; three main principles underpin it.
  • Learning is most effective with spaced repetition (flash cards/ small cross topic activities)
  • Interleaving helps pupils to discriminate between topics and aids long-term retention
  • Retrieval of previously learned content is frequent and regular, which increases both storage and retrieval strength.
  1. Learning activities and assessment (POP) tasks have been designed following the Chris Quigley milestones and the cognitive domain driver words for basic/advancing/deep understanding within each topic to specifically bench mark the pitch of each lesson. It is vital that students are given the purposeful opportunities to prove their understanding; cognitively and physically within each domain (basic, advancing and deep).
  2. In addition to the three principles, we also understand that learning is invisible in the short-term and that sustained mastery takes time.
  3. Our content is subject specific. We make intra-curricular links to strengthen schema.

 

Intent

At St. Elizabeth’s, we aim for children to have acquired the essential characteristics of language learners through a relevant, broad, vibrant and ambitious MFL curriculum:

  • An understanding of the relationships between language and identity and a deeper understanding of other cultures from around the world, including a better awareness of self, others and cultural differences.
  • The confidence to communicate in Spanish, speaking with good intonation and pronunciation about a variety of subjects.
  • A desire to embrace challenging activities, including a variety of tasks involving the 5 key skills of learning a language: listeningspeakingreading, writing and grammar.
  • The ability to communicate with a level of fluency and imagination, in spoken and written form.
  • The ability to read and listen to pieces of text with fluency and understanding.
  • A passion for Spanish and an enthusiastic engagement in learning, which develops a positive curiosity about the language and builds the skillset to produce life-long language learners.
  • A strong awareness of the culture and countries where the language is spoken.
  • A passion for languages and a commitment to the subject.
  • The ability to use language creatively and spontaneously, in a variety of contexts, laying down solid foundations for future language learning.
  • An independence in their studies and the ability to draw upon a wide range of resources.

 

Implementation

  1. Curriculum drivers shape our curriculum breadth in MFL. They are derived from an exploration of the backgrounds of our students, our beliefs about high quality education and our values. They are used to ensure we give our students appropriate and ambitious curriculum opportunities. Our curriculum drivers are community, spirituality, culture, democracy and possibilities.
  2. Cultural capital gives our students the vital background knowledge required to be informed and thoughtful members of our community who understand and believe in British values.
  3. Curriculum breadth is shaped by our curriculum driverscultural capitalsubject topics and our ambition for students to study the best of what has been thought and said by many generations of academics and scholars.
  4. Our curriculum distinguishes between subject topics and ‘Curriculum Themes’. Subject topics are the specific aspects of subjects that are studied.
  5. Curriculum Themes tie together the subject topics into meaningful schema. The same concepts are explored in a wide breadth of topics. Through this ‘forwards-and-backwards engineering’ of the curriculum, students return to the same themes over and over and gradually build understanding of them. In MFL, these curriculum themes are; Read fluently (involving recognising key vocabulary and phrases); Write imaginatively (using key vocabulary and phrases to write ideas); Speak confidently (using key vocabulary and phrases to verbally communicate ideas); Understand the culture of the countries in which the language is spoken (involving the background knowledge and cultural capital needed to infer meaning from interactions)
  6. Golden Threads: These ‘Golden Threads’ help students to relate each topic to previously studied topics and to form strong, meaningful schema. In MFL these Golden Threads include: Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, Grammar and Culture.
  7. Cognitive science tells us that working memory is limited and that cognitive load is too high if students are rushed through content. This limits the acquisition of long-term memory. Cognitive science also tells us that in order for students to become creative thinkers, or have a greater depth of understanding they must first master the basics, which taken time.
  8. Milestones: For each of the Curriculum Themes, there are three milestones, each of which includes the procedural and Golden Threads in each subject, giving students a way of expressing their understanding of the Curriculum. As MFL is taught only in KS2, pupils begin their learning within milestone 2, which is taught across Years 3 and 4 and milestone 3, which is taught across Year 5 and Year 6
  9. Cognitive Domains: Within each year group, students gradually progress in their procedural fluency and semantic strength through three cognitive domains: basic, advancing and deep. The goal for students is to display sustained mastery at the ‘advancing’ stage of understanding by the end of each phase (EYFS, Key Stage 1, Lower Key Stage 2, Upper Key Stage 2) and for the most able to have a greater depth of understanding at the ‘deep’ stage.
  10. Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Strategies: As part of our progression model we use a different pedagogical style in each of the cognitive domains of basic, advancing and deep. This is based on the research of Sweller, Kirschner and Rosenshine who argue to direct instruction in the early stages of learning and discovery based approaches later. We use direct instruction in the basic domain and problem based discovery in the deep domain. This is called the reversal effect.
  11. Also as part of our progression model we use POP tasks (Proof of Progress) which shows our curriculum expectations in each cognitive domain.
  12. Our curriculum design is based on evidence from cognitive science; three main principles underpin it:
  • Learning is most effective with spaced repetition.
  • Interleaving helps pupils to discriminate between topics and aids long-term retention.
  • Retrieval of previously learned content is frequent and regular, which increases both storage and retrieval strength.
  1. In addition to the three principles we also understand that learning is invisible in the short-term and that sustained mastery takes time.
  2. Our content is subject specific. We make intra-curricular links to strengthen schema.
  3. Continuous provision, in the form of daily routines, replaces the teaching of some aspects of the curriculum and, in other cases, provides retrieval practice for previously learned content.